ATC winners announced

The Arctic Technology Conference (ATC), which takes place 23-25 March 2015 in Copenhagen, Denmark has announced the two companies that will receive the 2015 Spotlight on Arctic Technology Award, recognising innovative new products that provide significant impact for Arctic exploration and production. The awards will be presented on 23 March, during the ATC on Ice Reception in Congress Halls A1/A2 at the Comwell Convention Centre.

Spotlight recipients and products for 2015:

  • Ovako - SZ-Steel®
  • Viking Supply Ships - Bulbous bow ice-breaking

Ovako - SZ-Steel®

SZ-Steel®, which means sub-zero, is a family of Ovako steels that are proven to retain properties for safer and more reliable performances in temperatures down to -40 ºC and beyond. One of the five Ovako attribute brands, SZ-Steel® is a family of steel grades with low impurity levels and controlled grain size that are well proven and tested to hold their key properties in sub-zero conditions. The grades comprise a range of products in the company’s portfolio including BQ-Steel, IQ-Steel, M-Steel and WR-Steel. The sub-zero steels reduce risks of embrittlement and fracturing. They are well-tested and proven to retain their material properties. The result is safer and more reliable performances in temperatures beneath -40 °C, and many of the steels are tested to withstand temperatures down to -100 °C and lower.


Viking Supply Ships - Bulbous bow ice-breaking

During the winter of 2013, Viking Supply Ships performed ice-trials of their Loke Viking-class Ice 1A AHTS. The ambition was to prove the bulbous bow's abilities to break ice in light/moderate ice conditions, and thus expand the operational area of the vessel class. The testing was performed in the southern part of the Bay of Bothnica, with typical ice thickness of 30-50 cm. The technology is based on bending the ice upwards with the bulb, opposite of the normal crushing technique used by a conventional ice-breaker bow. The tests showed that the vessel performed good at both ice-breaking, ridge penetration, manoeuvring and channel clearing. Results showed that the Loke Viking class' performance in light/moderate ice conditions is at the same level as that of Arctic purpose built supply Ice-breakers. Based on observations during the tests, small modifications were made to the bulbous bow upper part to improve the bow's function even more. The results from the tests clearly demonstrates the ability of using bulbous bow for ice-breaking in light/moderate ice conditions, which can give operators great advantage in open water operators.

A panel of qualified E&P professionals reviewed entries from exhibitors and selected recipients based on the following criteria:

  • New – The technology must be less than two years old.
  • Innovative – The technology must be original, groundbreaking, and capable of revolutionising the offshore E&P industry.
  • Proven – The technology must be proven, either through full-scale application or successful prototype testing.
  • Broad Interest – The technology must have broad interest and appeal for the industry.
  • Significant Impact – The technology must provide significant benefits beyond existing technologies.

In its fourth year, ATC brings together Arctic industry leaders and professionals from around the globe. It is the world’s most focused comprehensive technical conference and exhibition for Arctic E&P professionals.


Adapted from press release by Joe Green

Published on 05/03/2015


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